United Apostolic Church followers pray to both ancestors and Christian God at Fertility Caves

United Apostolic Church followers pray to both ancestors and Christian God at Fertility CavesMembers of the United Apostolic Church pray at the divine Fertility Caves deep in the Maloti Mountains near Clarens, South Africa, Dec. 14, 2011. The United Apostolic Church followers retain their traditional pre-Christian belief system of ancestor worship in parallel with their Christianity. At the Fertility Caves, the followers 'pray' to both the ancestors and Christian God. Living in the cave are various Sangoma's, or 'Witch doctors' who have been living in the caves for years and who appeal to the spirit world alongside the Christian beliefs of the United Apostolic Church followers.

A Christmas Story

A Christmas StoryThousands of years ago, the ancestors of the Eveny and Evenki tribes moved out of northeast China and spread out across forests, tundras and mountain ranges, from Mongolia to the Arctic Ocean, and from the Pacific almost to the Ural Mountains. They are the most widely spread indigenous people on any landmass on Earth.

Healing in the Navajo way

Healing in the Navajo wayTUBA CITY -- The medicine man remembered when the teenage boy requested his help.
The medicine man said he prefers not to use his name because he doesn't want the attention and wants to make sure that people who seek him out do so because they are determined.

Navajo Nation sues federal government in effort to have exhumed remains returned to tribe

Navajo Nation sues federal government in effort to have exhumed remains returned to tribeFLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Archaeologists curious about American Indian cultures dug up human remains and associated funerary objects at Canyon de Chelly decades ago, while some remains were taken for protection from erosion in the canyon with towering red, sandstone walls.

NSWC Port Hueneme celebrates Native Heritage Month

NSWC Port Hueneme celebrates Native Heritage MonthOn Nov. 29, 2011, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Port Hueneme paid homage to the country’s first Americans during the organization’s annual observance of Native American Indian and Alaskan Native (NAI-AN) Heritage Month.
NSWC Port Hueneme Division Technical Director Tim Troske provided opening remarks for the occasion, noting its importance for nurturing diversity and recognizing the valuable contributions of Native Americans. “It not only reflects the value of diversity that NSWC Port Hueneme cultivates each and every day,” he said, “it also enables us to offer special recognition to the original people of this land for their enduring spirit and achievements that have helped shape our great nation.”