Sweet Science: The Health Benefits of Chocolate

Sweet Science: The Health Benefits of ChocolateYet another health benefit has been linked to eating chocolate: It may decrease your risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

The analysis, which will be presented in April at the American Academy of Neurology's 62nd Annual Meeting, reviewed the results of three previous studies. One study with more than 44,000 participants found that those who ate a weekly serving of chocolate were 22 percent less likely to suffer a stroke than those who ate no chocolate.>>>

Ancient Greenland gene map has a surprise

Ancient Greenland gene map has a surpriseScientists have sequenced the DNA from four frozen hairs of a Greenlander who died 4,000 years ago in a study they say takes genetic technology into several new realms.

Surprisingly, the long-dead man appears to have originated in Siberia and is unrelated to modern Greenlanders, Morten Rasmussen of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues found.

"This provides evidence for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit," the researchers wrote in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.>>>

Pearson tells Aborigines to follow Jewish lead

Pearson tells Aborigines to follow Jewish leadProminent Aboriginal leader Noel Pearson has called on Aborigines to draw on the experience of Jewish people in never forgetting their history, while striving to overcome injustice and racism.

Speaking to members of the American Bar Association in Sydney, Mr Pearson also gave a damning assessment of Native Title, labelling the laws a travesty and a quagmire.>>>

State senator puts hit on hallucinogenic herb

State senator puts hit on hallucinogenic herbState Sen. Lisa M. Boscola wants to outlaw salvia divinorum, which is native to mountains in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca.

Name this substance: It causes hallucinations and creates the perception that one is having profound insights.

LSD? "Magic" mushrooms?

Nope.

It's salvia divinorum.>>>

Vancouver Olympics bring unprecedented opportunities to Canada's indigenous people

Vancouver Olympics bring unprecedented opportunities to CanadaAboriginal involvement goes beyond performances as tribes are encouraged to participate economically and athletically.

In 1999, the International Olympic Committee adopted Agenda 21, a document that called for Olympic host nations to use the Games as a means for creating sustainable development for traditionally disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples.

The following year, the Sydney Olympics gave Australia’s Aborigines a role to play in the Games, >>>