Roseville's new Maidu Museum opens today

Roseville To say today's opening of Roseville's new Maidu Museum and Historic Site celebrating native California culture has been a long time coming is an understatement measured by centuries.

The nine years the museum spent in temporary quarters (a 4,800-square-foot modular building) was a short duration compared with the thousands of years the native peoples waited for the kind of recognition they will get with the grand opening of a 10,000-square-foot brick roundhouse museum and art gallery.>>>

Aboriginal pavillion open and ready

Aboriginal pavillion open and readyThe 2010 Aboriginal Pavilion is ready to receive a projected 100,000 visitors and organizer Tewanee Joseph says the venue is about to make history.

Located at Georgia and Hamilton Streets, the pavilion opened to the public Monday Feb. 8, showcasing a 65-foot inflatable multi-media dome and the venue’s signature show, “We Are Here.”>>>

History is being made at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. And not just by the athletes in search of med

History is being made at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.  And not just by the athletes in search of medIt seems, that Australia's
indigenous Aboriginal population continues to be maltreated, and are in effect, social outcastes in one of the world's largest and lesser populated continents.
A visit to the country's Northern Territory reveals just how badly off this indigenous community is.
Take the case of the Alyawarr Aborigines. Sixty-eight years ago (1942), Banjo Morton forced the owners of the vast Lake Nash cattle station in the Northern Territory to pay him and other Aboriginal stockmen a pound a month when he led a walk-off from there.>>>

Native representation strong at 2010 Olympics

Native representation strong at 2010 OlympicsHistory is being made at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.

And not just by the athletes in search of medals or personal bests in a competition that may be the pinnacle of their sporting careers.

These games, which run Feb. 12 – 28, are also historic because there has been unprecedented aboriginal participation in the planning and hosting of the games.>>>

Our world may be a giant hologram

Our world may be a giant hologramDRIVING through the countryside south of Hanover, it would be easy to miss the GEO600 experiment. From the outside, it doesn't look much: in the corner of a field stands an assortment of boxy temporary buildings, from which two long trenches emerge, at a right angle to each other, covered with corrugated iron. Underneath the metal sheets, however, lies a detector that stretches for 600 metres.>>>