Ready or not, here comes '2012'

Ready or not, here comes Everyone knows something is going to happen Dec. 21, 2012.

It's what that something is that's up for debate. Either:
# The world will end.
# A new age of harmony will begin, or,
# Panic will ensue as men around the world wake up to realize there are only four shopping days left until Christmas.
In any event, we have another much-publicized doomsday deadline fast approaching and filmmakers and book publishers know it. According to the Mayan calendar — which can't be purchased at your local Hallmark store because it hasn't been used since the 1500s>>>

Performing the ’Jindo Sitgimgut,’ for women in the entertainment industry

Performing the ’Jindo Sitgimgut,’ for women in the entertainment industryA female shaman performs the ’Jindo Sitgimgut,’ a shamanist ritual for cleansing the soul of deceased persons, for women in the entertainment industry including Jang Ja-yeon, who committed suicide in March.>>>

MONGOLIA: SHAMANISM IS MAKING A COMEBACK

MONGOLIA: SHAMANISM IS MAKING A COMEBACKWhen Degi, a 24-year-old web designer in Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar, hit a pedestrian in July 2008 with his Daewoo sedan, his luck took a turn for the worse. His company didn’t get a contract he was hoping for, and misfortune seemed to hover over his personal life. The family of the victim extorted money from him, threatening to sue and warning him that they had connections in the courts. So Degi, like many Mongolians, took his troubles to a shaman.>>>

A buried village mourns, and plans for the future

A buried village mourns, and plans for the futureIt was a day with tears of joy and sorrow when villagers in Siaolin Village (小林) in Kaohsiung County’s Jiasian Township (甲仙) held their annual Arit Festival on Saturday, nearly three months after their village was almost completely buried by mudslides.

“Arit” is the word in the Siraya language for “ancestral spirit.” For the Sirayas, the annual festival to pay homage to the Arit is their most important religious event.>>>

Why the world won't end in 2012 A new film suggests an apocalypse is coming, but the Maya disagree

Why the world wonMAYAN RIVIERA, MEXICO–If there's a word in Mayan for "malarkey" that's what shaman Gerardo Carrera thinks of Hollywood's end-of-days spin on Dec. 21, 2012.

With Roland Emmerich's big-budget disaster movie 2012 riding a wave of studio publicity into theatres Nov. 13, people are talking about what seems to be the date the sophisticated Maya calendar runs out, perhaps triggering the downfall of civilization.