Aboriginals face most problems when treated for kidney disease

Aboriginals face most problems when treated for kidney diseaseA new study reveals that aboriginals in Canada have a higher infection and death rate when being treated for kidney disease and renal failure than the rest of the population, but scientists can't confirm why.

The study, by researchers from St. Boniface General Hospital and the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, studied 727 adults — 161 of whom were Aboriginal — with end stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis, a process that uses a membrane in the abdomen called the peritoneum to filter wastes and excess water.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/health/Aboriginals+face+most+problems+when+treated+kidney+disease/3323936/story.html#ixzz0utDMLuW0

Diary of a journey through Aboriginal communities is priced at £40,000

Diary of a journey through Aboriginal communities is priced at £40,000A handwritten account of an extraordinary trip to the remote areas of Western Australia's North-West Coast is being auctioned at Bonham's Travel and Exploration sale in London.

In 1982, five famous Australians, the artist John Olsen, writers Dame Mary Durack and Geoffrey Dutton, the conservationist Vincent Serventy and the art dealer and collector Alex Bortignon, set out on a 10 week journey to visit Aboriginal and other isolated communities and to study the land forms of the area.

Battling aboriginal tradition

Battling aboriginal traditionMark Podlasly complains of aboriginal stereotypes: poverty, crime, poor education, unemployment. All are present to varying extents in aboriginal Canada, but there are lots of Mark Podlaslys, too: well-educated, articulate, professional aboriginals, living off-reserve, who don’t accept the vision of most of the country’s native political leaders.

Decades of water safety training culturally “irrelevant” to First Nation people

Decades of water safety training culturally “irrelevant” to First Nation peopleCanada’s aboriginal people and others at high risk of drowning are among those least served by conventional water safety training, say injury prevention experts.

“There’s been a longstanding stigma that aboriginal people are too stupid or don’t want to learn about water safety, and that’s just ridiculous,” says Audrey Giles, an associate professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa in Ontario. “Aboriginal communities on frozen waterfronts get sent posters and instructions targeted at white children in heated swimming pools. We shouldn’t be shocked that this isn’t getting the right message across.”

The house that ‘Mama Jane’ built

The house that ‘Mama Jane’ builtIF you take the road from Bergville that seems to wind slowly towards the Drakensberg mountains, as though it knows it’s in the presence of majesty, you cross over the Woodstock Dam. Pass a trading store that looks like the set of a Western movie, carry on up the hill and you will see a thatched cottage to the right.