Mingo Big Bear Claw shares tribal history with children

Mingo Big Bear Claw shares tribal history with childrenHARTSVILLE - More than 100 children gathered at the Hartsville Memorial Library for the Summer Reading Program “Make a Splash…Read” to listen to (Vernon Tanner) Mingo Big Bear Claw, chief of Chaloklowa Chickasaw. The medicine man and tribal administrator told the children about how the Native Americans lived many years ago in this area. Mingo Big Bear Claw is from Indiantown in rural Williamsburg County, South Carolina.

Stonehenge Discovery: Wooden Monument Found Near Stone Ciricle

Stonehenge Discovery: Wooden Monument Found Near Stone CiricleScientists scouring the area around Stonehenge said Thursday they have uncovered a circular structure only a few hundred meters (yards) from the world famous monument.

There's some debate about what exactly has been found. The survey team which uncovered the structure said it could be the foundation for a circle of freestanding pieces of timber, a wooden version of Stonehenge.

Profile: Kerry Arabena

Profile: Kerry ArabenaLast week, Kerry Arabena graduated with a doctorate in human ecology from ANU, two months after being appointed the co-chairwoman of the new National Congress of Australia's First Peoples.

Arabena, 42, who is a descendant from the Torres Strait's Meriam people (with some German and Spanish heritage thrown into the mix), is thrilled that her personal success may inspire others.

Port Macquarie chosen to host major Aboriginal cultural festival

Port Macquarie chosen to host major Aboriginal cultural festivalPort Macquarie's infrastructure, capacity to support large crowds, and it's appeal to tourists are the reasons it has been chosen to host a major Aboriginal cultural festival.

The town will stage the Australia Day Saltwater Freshwater Festival, which was held for the first time this year at Coffs Harbour.

Medicine wheel event in Whittier reintroduces centuries-old spiritual tradition

Medicine wheel event in Whittier reintroduces centuries-old spiritual traditionWHITTIER — In Native American culture, medicine does not come from a pharmacy. Instead, medicine can be anything that promotes balance in one's life and the lives of others, said Jacquelyn Dobrinska, Venus Rising Institute outreach coordinator.

“In Western culture, medicine is about getting to the store, purchasing the prescription we need and then getting better as we take it,” she said. “In Native American culture, it is all about bringing harmony back into our lives.”